Saturday, March 28, 2009

Adam And Eve - Right And Wrong

One day I started thinking about Adam and Eve. Thinking about right and wrong. Now, I asked myself a question:

Didn't Adam and Eve know the difference between right and wrong when they were told by the serpent to eat the fruit off the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil?

This leads me into the next question is just thought of:

Were they that easily influenced that they ate the fruit off the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil without thinking twice?

God did tell them specifically not to eat the fruit off the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil.

Genesis 2:16-17 says:

"16And the LORD God commanded the man, 'You are free to eat from any tree in the garden; 17but you must not eat from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil, for when you eat of it you will surely die.'"

See God explicitly says not to eat the fruit off that tree, but they did anyways. Did they know the consequences of their actions? Sure, as God said point blank what would happen. But they did it anyways.

Was the temptation of seeing if they could get away with it too strong that they thought they would do it anyways?

It seems as though Adam and Eve trusted the serpent because he seemingly pitched a good deal to Adam and Eve.

In Genesis 3:4-5:

4"You will not surely die," the serpent said to the woman. 5"For God knows that when you eat of it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil."

Was being able to see the reason that why they trusted the serpent?

Some signs point to yes. But was it truly worth it? Did disobeying God make them feel like a badass? I doubt they thought: "We are sure showed God!"

S0me signs point to the fact that they didn't know what they were doing is wrong as they didn't have knowledge like we do now to make the connection and see what we are doing is wrong. But you always here about Adam and Eve having the freewill to choose. If that is the case wouldn't the have just chose to not eat that fruit off the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. Didn't the consequences of God's wrath pop in their minds be a factor in deciding against eating the forbidden fruit? Afterall, God in the Old Testament was more wrathful than in the New Testament or now.

This something I have been thinking about. Maybe someone can make sense of it all.

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